Thursday, March 22, 2012

Bingo ball basket and the fate of one man...

Her hair hung askew in curlers. Her shoes and reindeer socks mismatched. Heavy makeup was smeared on her face.
Denver District Court Judge Anne Mansfield — presiding over jury selection June 28 — quickly dismissed the woman, who explained in disjointed speech, "I broke out of domestic violence in the military. And I have a lot of repercussions. One is post-traumatic stress disorder."
Now Juror No. 4361 — published author and Denver cosmetologist Susan Cole — faces felony charges after allegedly bragging months later on a radio program that she fabricated the elaborate ruse to duck jury duty.

Turns out, Judge Mansfield was listening.

*Original article published in the Denver Post


I considered lying to get out of Jury duty.I got summoned not that long ago. But alas...I didn't have the guts to even try. I am a chicken when it comes to stuff like that. So I went through the whole selection process and low and behold out of like 400 people that were summoned, I did get chosen as an alternate juror. I didn't end up having to serve, thankfully. The trial was cancelled the day before I was to show up to see if my juror services we re required. Total relieve! But did you know that each potential juror is assigned a number and how they choose is by putting all the numbers in one of those metal baskets that close up, you know like the ones that they use to put bingo balls in and mix them up? That is how the jury is ultimately chosen...kind of strange huh?



It was kind of like this but solid metal, so you couldn't see into it. Each of the potential juror's assigned  number was put on a card and put into here and if they picked you number, you go stand in front of the judge and defence and prosecution lawyers. They say yes or no to you and if they say yes, damn. Your on the jury!
All they know about you is your name and your occupation.

Would you want your fate in the hands of someone that was selected this way?

I don't know that I would! I am sure for more serious cases than this one was, the selection process must be a little more in depth. I don't want to find out though.

Jury duty, not for me thanks!